Maude Miner Hadden

Maude E. Miner Hadden (1880–1967) was a pioneer in the field of social work 22 and an activist in the anti-prostitution movement. She was the first woman probation officer of the Magistrates' court in New York City, and the co-founder of Waverly House for Girls, the Girls Service League, the Committee on Protective Work for Girls, the Institute of World Affairs, and the Palm Beach Round Table.

Early life

Maude Miner Hadden was born in Leyden, Massachusetts in June 1880. She was the daughter of James R. and Mary E. (Newcomb) Miner. Maude graduated from Smith College in 1901, and earned an M. A. (1906) and doctorate (1917) from Columbia University. She taught history and mathematics at Hood College in Maryland, from 1901 to 1906, before moving into social work.[1][2][3]

Hadden's Ph.D. thesis, Slavery of Prostitution: A Plea for Emancipation, was published as a book in 1916.[4]

Social reform

Hadden was a pioneer in the field of social work, the first woman probation officer of the Magistrates' court in New York City where she served in the Night Court from 1907 to 1909.[3][5] She was also appointed a member of the New York State Probation Commission by the governor[2] and served as secretary of the New York Protective and Probation Association starting in 1913.[6] Through her work with young women in the courts, Miner came to believe in legal and education reform to end prostitution.[7]

How can prostitution be suppressed? By enacting adequate laws against prostitution and securing honest enforcement of laws, by dealing wisely and effectively with offenders when they come into the courts, by doing preventive work to lessen both demand and supply, and by arousing and sustaining a public demand that prostitution shall be suppressed.

— Maude Miner, 1914, [6]

Waverly House

In 1908, Hadden and her sister, Stella Miner, opened Waverly House for Girls at 165 West 10th Street in Manhattan. Waverly House was a temporary home for young women, many of whom were runaways, who were released from the courts on probation. The staff of Waverly House helped the girls to return home or gain safe employment. The New York Probation Association was formed to help fund Waverly house. Donators included Andrew Carnegie and Mrs. Russell Sage.[5][8]

Girls' Service League

Hadden and Stella also founded the Girls Service League in 1908.[1][2][3] The purpose of the Girls' Service League was, in Hadden's words, "to help needy girls through intensive personal contact and by bringing them together as a group into a homelike atmosphere".[9] The League offered housing, guidance, vocational advice, work training, and educational opportunities. The Girls' Service League opened in Manhattan, then expanded to other New York locations. Hadden served as president of the Girls' Service League for 12 years.[2][10]

Committee on Protective Work for Girls

After the United States entered World War I, Miner established the Committee on Protective Work for Girls (CPWG) to address the problem of prostitution and venereal disease around military training camps. The Chamberlain–Kahn Act, passed in 1918, addressed the same problem, but with more repressive results. Under this law, women suspected to be prostitutes could be detained, inspected, and sent to a rehabilitation center if they were suspected of having a venereal disease.[11] Eventually the interest in policing military camps increased, and the CPWG was placed under the War Department's Division of Law Enforcement. Miner resigned as director of the committee, and in a private letter she stated that the War Department was placing the well-being of soldiers over that of the women.[7][12]

Miner and other former members of the CPWG also criticized the Chamberlain–Kahn Act at a national conference on venereal disease in 1920, stating that it deprived women of their personal liberties, discriminated against women, and was ineffective in protecting society from venereal disease.[7][12]

Marriage and international peace initiatives

In 1924, Miner married Alexander Mactier Hadden, grandson of silk importer David Hadden. Together they founded and ran the Institute of World Affairs. After Alexander died in 1942, Maude continued this work.[2]

Institute of World Affairs

The idea for an international students' union "dedicated to the promotion of international understanding and goodwill"[1] came to the Haddens during a honeymoon layover in Geneva, the headquarters of the League of Nations. The Students International Union was founded in 1924 with 18 students from six countries. It quickly increased to more than 200 students, and the group moved to new quarters overlooking University Park, Geneva.[1][2]

In 1941, the Students International Union moved to Salisbury, Connecticut, because of the dangers of World War II, and changed its name to the Institute of World Affairs. It was located on 300 acres of farmland in northwestern Connecticut, near Twin Lakes.[1] The Institute ran summer seminars in Connecticut every year from 1940 to 1993.[1][13] As of 1967 (the year of Hadden's death), nearly 2,000 students from 87 countries had graduated from the program.[1]

In 1957, Hadden and the Institute were nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.[2][14]

Palm Beach Round Table

The Haddens founded the Palm Beach Round Table in Palm Beach, Florida in 1932. The Round Table began as casual meetings in private homes, and eventually moved to the Everglades Club. The Round Table sponsors an annual series of lectures on current affairs. Speakers at the Round Table have included Jonathan Wainwright, John Mason Brown, H. R. Knickerbocker, Barbara Cartland, Omar Bradley, James W. Fulbright, Maria von Trapp, Douglas MacArthur, Richard Nixon, Ralph Nader, Benjamin Netanyahu, and Bob Dole. Hadden served as president from its founding to 1962. In 2021, the Round Table celebrated its 90th anniversary.[2][15]

Later years and legacy

In addition to her publications on prostitution and world peace, Hadden was the author of two volumes of poetry, Garnet Rock and High Horizons, and an autobiography, Quest for peace : personal and political.[2]

Hadden died April 14, 1967 in Palm Beach, Florida, and was buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, Manhattan, New York City.[1]

Works

  • Slavery of prostitution, a plea for emancipation, New York: The Macmillan Company, 1916[4]
  • Quest for peace: personal and political, Washington, D.C.: Farrar, 1968[16]
  • Garnet rock, New York: Comet Press, 1944[17]
  • High horizons, New York: Whittier Books, 1957[18]
  • "Probation work in the Magistrates' Courts of New York City", New York: New York Probation Association, 1909.[19]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Mrs. Maude Hadden, founder of Institute of World Affairs". The Berkshire Eagle. April 21, 1967. p. 14. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "25-year round table work of Mrs. Hadden celebrated". The Palm Beach Post. February 17, 1958. p. 10. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Maude Miner Hadden". go-gale-com. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  4. ^ a b Miner, Maude E (1916). "Slavery of prostitution, a plea for emancipation, by Maude E. Miner ..." The Macmillan Company. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  5. ^ a b "Girls at night court". New-York Tribune. 18 January 1908. p. 10. Archived from the original on 5 August 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  6. ^ a b Miner, Maude (1914). "Report of committee on Social Hygiene". Journal of Social Hygiene. 1 (1): 81–92. Archived from the original on August 6, 2022. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  7. ^ a b c Blackman, Kayla (2014). "Public Power, Private Matters: The American Social Hygiene Association and the Policing of Sexual Health in the Progressive Era". scholarworks.umt.edu. University of Montana. pp. 1–125. Archived from the original on August 6, 2022. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  8. ^ "For girls arrested: Probation association has large home for its charges". New-York Tribune. May 30, 1908. p. 8. Archived from the original on August 6, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  9. ^ "Maude and Alexander Hadden". youth-foundation.org. Archived from the original on 2021-06-19. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  10. ^ "Girls' Service League tea tomorrow afternoon". Times Union. March 15, 1933. p. 8. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  11. ^ Kelly, Kim (22 May 2018). "A Forgotten War on Women". The New Republic. Archived from the original on 2022-07-09. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  12. ^ a b Hobson, Barbara Meil (1987). Uneasy virtue : the politics of prostitution and the American Reform tradition. New York : Basic Books. pp. 165–183. ISBN 978-0-465-08868-3.
  13. ^ "IWA History – Institute of World Affairs". www.iwa.org. Archived from the original on 2021-06-24. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  14. ^ "Nomination%20archive". NobelPrize.org. 1 April 2020. Archived from the original on 2014-10-12. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  15. ^ Allerton, Tracy (November 28, 2021). "Season preview: Round Table's 90th season promises to be as lively and stimulating as ever". Palm Beach Daily News. Archived from the original on August 6, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  16. ^ Hadden, Maude Miner (1968). "Quest for peace: personal and political". Farrar. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  17. ^ Hadden, Maude Miner (1944). "Garnet rock". Comet Press. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  18. ^ Hadden, Maude Miner (1957). "High horizons, a collection of poems". Whittier Books. Archived from the original on August 5, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
  19. ^ Miner, Maude E (1909). "Probation work in the Magistrates' Courts of New York City". New York Probation Association. Archived from the original on August 9, 2022. Retrieved August 5, 2022.
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